Seville Orange Marmalade Recipes

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CLASSIC SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



Classic Seville Orange Marmalade image

Although it's traditionally made with sour orange and lemon, marmalade is open to interpretation.

Provided by Martha Stewart

Categories     Food & Cooking     Healthy Recipes     Gluten-Free Recipes

Yield Makes about 2 quarts

Number Of Ingredients 4

8 Seville oranges, 6 oranges peeled, peels cut into 1/3-inch pieces, flesh seeded and coarsely chopped; 2 oranges quartered, thinly sliced, and seeded
2 lemons, quartered, thinly sliced, and seeded
1 1/2 quarts cold water
Sugar

Steps:

  • Bring fruit, peels, and water to a boil in a large saucepan. Cook for 5 minutes. Turn off heat, cover, and let cool. Refrigerate for 8 hours (or up to 1 day).
  • Freeze a plate. Uncover citrus mixture, and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Cook until thickest peel is tender, about 20 minutes. Measure mixture, and return to pan. For each cup of mixture, add 3/4 cup sugar.
  • Bring mixture to a boil, stirring often. Cook until mixture registers 220 degrees to 222 degrees on a candy thermometer, about 20 minutes. To test for doneness of marmalade: Drop a spoonful on frozen plate. If marmalade has a slight film when pushed with a finger, it's done. If it spreads out and thins immediately, continue cooking, and test again after a few minutes. Transfer marmalade to airtight containers, cover, and let cool at room temperature. Refrigerate overnight before serving.

ULTIMATE SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



Ultimate Seville orange marmalade image

The original, and classic, English marmalade, as made famous by Paddington Bear

Provided by Good Food team

Categories     Breakfast, Condiment

Time 4h

Yield Makes about 4.5kg/10lb

Number Of Ingredients 3

1.3kg Seville orange
2 lemons , juice only
2.6kg preserving or granulated sugar

Steps:

  • Put the whole oranges and lemon juice in a large preserving pan and cover with 2 litres/4 pints water - if it does not cover the fruit, use a smaller pan. If necessary weight the oranges with a heat-proof plate to keep them submerged. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer very gently for around 2 hours, or until the peel can be easily pierced with a fork.
  • Warm half the sugar in a very low oven. Pour off the cooking water from the oranges into a jug and tip the oranges into a bowl. Return cooking liquid to the pan. Allow oranges to cool until they are easy to handle, then cut in half. Scoop out all the pips and pith and add to the reserved orange liquid in the pan. Bring to the boil for 6 minutes, then strain this liquid through a sieve into a bowl and press the pulp through with a wooden spoon - it is high in pectin so gives marmalade a good set.
  • Pour half this liquid into a preserving pan. Cut the peel, with a sharp knife, into fine shreds. Add half the peel to the liquid in the preserving pan with the warm sugar. Stir over a low heat until all the sugar has dissolved, for about 10 minutes, then bring to the boil and bubble rapidly for 15- 25 minutes until setting point is reached.
  • Take pan off the heat and skim any scum from the surface. (To dissolve any excess scum, drop a small knob of butter on to the surface, and gently stir.) Leave the marmalade to stand in the pan for 20 minutes to cool a little and allow the peel to settle; then pot in sterilised jars, seal and label. Repeat from step 3 for second batch, warming the other half of the sugar first.

THE ULTIMATE TRADITIONAL SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



The Ultimate Traditional Seville Orange Marmalade image

Making a traditional British marmalade is easier than you think. It takes time but worth the effort as you will see at every breakfast you serve it.

Provided by Elaine Lemm

Categories     Jam / Jelly

Time 6h30m

Number Of Ingredients 3

4 kilos (9 lbs) Seville oranges , washed in cold water
4 large unwaxed lemons
6 kilos (13.25 lbs) granulated sugar

Steps:

  • Measure 8 litres/16 pints water and pour into the preserving pan.
  • Halve the oranges and lemons and squeeze the juice into a jug. Add the juice to the water and place the pips plus any bits of pith onto a muslin square. Tie the muslin square with kitchen string to hold the pips and pith and add to the pan.
  • Shred the orange and lemon peel into thick strips. Don't cut too thin or they will dissolve in the cooking process. Add the peel to the pan.
  • Bring the water and juice up to the boil then reduce to a steady simmer for 2 to 3 hours or until the peel is soft.
  • Remove the bag of pips from the pan and leave to cool until you can hold it in your hand.
  • Add the sugar to the pan constantly stirring until all the sugar is dissolved. Squeeze the bag of pips over the pan and extract as much of the jelly-like substance, this helps with the setting of the marmalade. Stir again.
  • Turn up the heat and bring to a fast boil for 20 mins, check for setting consistency. Continue boiling until the marmalade reaches the setting point (check every 10 minutes) taking care to stir from time to time to prevent the jam sticking to the bottom and burning. Skim off any scum that rises to the surface with a slotted spoon. Once the setting point is reached, turn off the heat and leave to settle for 20 minutes.
  • Spoon the marmalade into the heated jars using a ladle and funnel. Seal and leave to cool. Store in a cool dark place. Will keep up to one year.

Nutrition Facts : Calories 1166 kcal, Carbohydrate 301 g, Cholesterol 0 mg, Fiber 0 g, Protein 0 g, SaturatedFat 0 g, Sodium 3 mg, Fat 0 g, ServingSize 20 servings per 1 lb jar, UnsaturatedFat 0 g

CLASSIC SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



Classic Seville Orange Marmalade image

Seville oranges are much stronger and more sour than ordinary eating oranges, but marmalade can be made from nearly any citrus fruit. The goal is a combination of tender strips of peel surrounded by a sweet-sour light gel. Marmalade recipes are notoriously fussy and complicated. I've streamlined and simplified the process. It does still take some time, but it's a little effort for a big reward!

Provided by Virginia Willis

Categories     condiment

Time 2h

Yield About 4 cups or four 1/2-pint jars

Number Of Ingredients 3

6 large Seville oranges, sour oranges or grapefruit
4 cups sugar
1/2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt

Steps:

  • Place a wire rack in a rimmed baking sheet or line it with a clean towel. Set aside. Place several small plates in the freezer to use later to test the consistency of the marmalade.
  • Halve and juice the oranges. You should have about 2 cups. Place the juice in a large pot. Using your fingers, remove the membranes and seeds from the hollowed shells and tie them up in a piece of cheesecloth. Add the cheesecloth filled with the membranes and seeds to the pot containing the juice.
  • Cut the peel of the oranges into matchsticks. Put the strips of peel into the pot with the juice and the cheesecloth containing the membrane and seeds. Pour over 4 cups water, or enough water so that the water and juice cover the strips of peel (it will depend on the size of your pot). Bring to a boil and then simmer gently until the peels are soft and tender, 45 to 60 minutes.
  • Allow to cool until the bag of membranes and seeds is cool enough to squeeze, about 20 minutes (be careful, it will be hot!). (You can also cover it and leave the marmalade to sit in the refrigerator overnight.) Once cooled, squeeze the pectin-packed cheesecloth until "dry." Discard. Add the sugar and salt and stir well until dissolved.
  • Return the peels and liquid to the heat. Bring to a boil over high heat until the marmalade reaches the jelling point, 220 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer, 15 to 20 minutes. The peels will be shiny and glass-like. (If you don't have a thermometer, you can also dribble a few drops of the marmalade on a frozen plate. If it crinkles when you run a finger through it and your finger leaves a clear line in the marmalade, it's ready. If not, check it every 5 minutes or so.)
  • While the marmalade is cooking, place the canning rack in the canner and fill the pot with water; bring to a boil over high heat.
  • Place 4 clean 1/2-pint jars (see Cook's Notes) on the prepared baking sheet. (This will help contain any dribbles or spills and prevent the jars from directly touching the metal.) For each jar, insert a canning funnel and carefully ladle in the marmalade, allowing at least 1/4 inch of headroom. Clean the rims of the jars with a clean, damp towel and tightly secure the lids.
  • Using tongs, place the jars on the rack in the canner. The water should cover the jars by at least 1 inch. Cover the canner. Return the water to a boil and boil gently for 10 minutes. Using tongs, transfer the jars to a towel to cool. If the seal works and fits properly, the metal lid will be slightly concave within 24 hours of processing. Store the unopened jars of marmalade at room temperature for up to 1 year. Once the marmalade is opened, store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



Seville Orange Marmalade image

Categories     Breakfast     Side     Christmas     Orange     Raw     Simmer     Boil

Number Of Ingredients 10

Sliced fruit method
2 1/4 pounds Seville oranges
1/3 cup lemon juice
10 cups Demerara sugar
(makes five to six 12-ounce jars)
Whole fruit method
2 1/4 pounds Seville oranges
1/3 cup lemon juice
10 cups granulated sugar
(makes five 12-ounce jars)

Steps:

  • Sliced fruit method
  • Scrub the oranges, remove the buttons at the top of the fruit, then cut in half. Squeeze out the juice and keep to one side. Using a sharp knife, slice the peel, pith and all, into thin, medium, or chunky shreds, according to your preference. Put the sliced peel into a bowl with the orange juice and cover with 10 cups of water. Let soak overnight or for up to 24 hours.
  • Transfer the whole mixture to a preserving pan, bring to a boil, then simmer slowly, covered, until the peel is tender. This should take approximately 2 hours, by which time the contents of the pan will have reduced by about one-third.
  • Stir in the lemon juice and sugar. Bring the marmalade to a boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Boil rapidly until the setting point is reached (see p. 41), 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from the heat. Let cool for 8 to 10 minutes-a little longer if the peel is in very chunky pieces-then stir gently to disperse any scum. Pour into warm, sterilized jars and seal immediately (see pp. 21-22). Use within 2 years.
  • Whole fruit method
  • Scrub the oranges, remove the buttons at the top, and put the whole oranges into a preserving pan with 10 cups of water. Bring to a boil, then simmer, covered, for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until the orange skins are tender and can be pierced easily with a fork.
  • When cool enough to handle, take the oranges out. Measure and keep the cooking water-you should have about 7 cups. Bring it up to this amount with more water if you have less, or boil to reduce if you have more.
  • Cut the oranges in half and remove the seeds with a fork, flicking them into a bowl. Strain any juice from the seeds back into the cooking water, then discard the seeds.
  • Meanwhile, cut up the orange peel and flesh into thick, medium, or thin shreds. Put the cut-up fruit into the strained cooking liquid. Add the lemon juice and sugar and bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar has completely dissolved. Bring to a rolling boil and boil rapidly until the setting point is reached (see p. 41), 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Let cool for 10 to 12 minutes-a little longer if you've cut the peel into very chunky pieces-then stir gently to disperse any scum. Pour into warm, sterilized jars and seal immediately (see pp. 21-22). Use within 2 years.
  • Variations
  • You can use both methods for making many other delicious marmalades:
  • Lemon marmalade with honey
  • Use 2 1/4 pounds of lemons instead of oranges, and omit the extra lemon juice. Replace 1 1/4 cups of the sugar with 3/4 cup of honey, adding it at the same time.
  • Three-fruit marmalade
  • Use a mixture of grapefruit, lemons, and sweet oranges to make a total of 2 1/4 pounds of fruit.
  • Ruby red marmalade
  • Both pink grapefruit and blood oranges make wonderful marmalades, though I prefer to use the sliced fruit method for these fruits. Add 3 tablespoons of lemon juice to every pound of fruit.
  • Seville and ginger marmalade
  • Replace 1 1/4 cups of the sugar with 9 ounces of chopped crystallized ginger, adding it along with the sugar.
  • Whiskey marmalade
  • Add 1/4 cup of whiskey to the marmalade at the end of cooking.
  • P.S.
  • Don't limit marmalade to the breakfast table, for its traits and qualities can be well used in other culinary ways. I like to replace candied peel in fruitcakes with a tablespoonful or two of marmalade, and I always add some to my Christmas mincemeat (p. 74). Marmalade makes a marvelous glaze for oven-baked ham, as well as sweet-and-sour chicken or pork dishes. Best of all, 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls will make a glorious golden topping for a good old-fashioned steamed pudding.
  • P.P.S.
  • For generations, marmalade makers have cooked up the mass of seeds found inside citrus fruits in the belief that they are full of pectin. However, most of the pectin is actually found in the citrus peel, and I rely purely on this for the setting power in my marmalades.

SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE



Seville orange marmalade image

Seville oranges are the key ingredient for this delicious, tangy marmalade

Provided by Good Food team

Categories     Afternoon tea, Breakfast, Condiment, Dinner, Lunch

Time 2h45m

Yield Makes 3 x 450g/1lb jars marmalade, plus 1 x 100g/3½oz jar

Number Of Ingredients 3

4 Seville oranges (about 500g/1lb 2oz in total), scrubbed
1.7l water
1kg granulated sugar

Steps:

  • Halve the oranges and squeeze the juice into a large stainless-steel pan. Scoop the pips and pulp into a sieve over the pan and squeeze out as much juice as possible, then tie the pulp and pips in the muslin. Shred the remaining peel and pith, either by hand with a sharp knife or in a food processor (a food processor will give very fine flecks rather than strips of peel). Add the shredded peel and muslin bag to the pan along with the water. Leave to soak overnight. This helps to extract the maximum amount of pectin from the fruit pulp, which will give a better set. It also helps to soften the peel, which will reduce the amount of cooking needed.
  • Put the pan over a medium heat, then bring up to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, for 1½-2 hrs, until the peel has become very soft. (The cooking time will be affected by how thickly you have cut the peel.) To see if the peel is ready, pick out a thicker piece and press it between your thumb and finger. It should look slightly see-through and feel soft when you rub it.
  • Carefully remove the muslin bag, allow to cool slightly, then, wearing the rubber gloves, squeeze out as much liquid as possible to extract the pectin from the fruit pulp. Discard the bag and weigh the simmered peel mixture. There should be between 775-800g; if less, then top up with water to 775g.
  • Put 4 small plates in the freezer, ready to use when testing for setting point. Add the sugar to the pan, then put over a low heat. Warm gently so that the sugar dissolves completely, stirring occasionally. Do not boil, before the sugar is dissolved.
  • Increase the heat and bring up to the boil but do not stir while the marmalade is boiling. After about 5 mins the marmalade will start to rise up the pan (it may drop back and then rise again) and larger bubbles will cover the surface. After 8-10 mins boiling, test for setting point. Times will vary according to the size of the pan - in a large pan this takes 7-8 mins, in other pans it may take 12-15 mins. As setting point can be easily missed it's better to test too early than too late.
  • To test the setting point: take the pan off the heat and allow the bubbles to subside. Take a plate from the freezer and spoon a little liquid onto the plate, then return to the freezer for 1 min. Push the marmalade along the plate with your finger. If setting point has been reached then the marmalade surface will wrinkle slightly and the marmalade won't run back straight away. If it's not at setting point, return to the heat and boil again for 2 mins before re-testing. Repeat until setting point is reached. If you have a sugar thermometer, setting point is reached at 105C, but it's good to do the plate test as well.
  • Leave the marmalade to stand for 10 mins or until starting to thicken. If there's any scum on the surface, spoon it off. Transfer the marmalade to sterilised jars. Cover with a wax disc (wax side down) and seal. When cold, label the jars and store in a cool, dark cupboard. The marmalade should keep for up to a year.

Nutrition Facts : Calories 28 calories, Carbohydrate 7 grams carbohydrates, Sugar 7 grams sugar

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From bbc.co.uk


SEVILLE ORANGE WHISKEY MARMALADE - IMBIBE MAGAZINE
2014-11-19 Cut the cooked oranges in half, then, using a spoon, scoop out the flesh, seeds and pith into a saucepan. Add the remaining 2 cups of water to the pan and bring to a boil; lower the heat and simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes. Strain this mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into the pot with the cooking water from the oranges.
From imbibemagazine.com


ORANGE MARMALADE RECIPE (QUICK COOKING, LOW SUGAR)
2019-10-26 Add 3 tablespoons lemon juice. Mix 2 1/2 cups sugar and 3 teaspoons pectin powder in a separate bowl. Bring fruit mix back to a boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1-2 minutes to dissolve pectin. Bring orange marmalade back to a full boil.
From commonsensehome.com


RECIPE: SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE - CLAN HUNTER'S OFFICIAL SITE
2022-02-02 Method. Start by scrubbing the fruit clean. Then quarter the fruit and put in a large preserving pan (preferably with a lid / covering) and bring to a boil. Once boiling, turn down the heat and let it simmer for between one and two hours or until the fruit is soft.
From clanhunterscotland.com


SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE/ PRUE LEITH/ COOKING - PRUE LEITH
Leave to soak for 24hours if time. Transfer to a preserving pan or large saucepan and simmer gently until the orange rind is soft and transparent-looking (about 2 hours). Remove the bag of pips and place the bag in a sieve. Using a wooden spoon, press any liquid from the bag back into the marmalade. Tip the sugar and treacle into the orange pulp.
From prue-leith.com


MARMALADE ORANGE SEVILLE - BERNARDIN
Add 1cup (250 ml) water; cover bowl; let stand overnight. Slice peel very thinly. Place in a second glass or micro-wave bowl. Add just enough water to keep peel moist; cover bowl; let stand again overnight. Stirring and mashing pulp mixture frequently, microwave at medium-high (70%) power 10 to 14 minutes, to release juices.
From bernardin.ca


SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE | LUCY WAVERMAN'S KITCHEN
2018-08-03 Bring to a boil. Cover tightly and simmer over medium-low heat for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until oranges are very soft. Turn oranges occasionally for even cooking. Remove oranges from pot with a slotted spoon. Cool slightly, and then cut in half. Using a teaspoon, scrape seeds and flesh into a cheesecloth bag.
From lucywaverman.com


SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE | RNZ RECIPES
Makes 3 x 450g jars marmalade, plus 1 x 100g jar. Ingredients. 4 Seville oranges (about 500g/1lb 2oz in total), scrubbed; 1.7l water; 1kg granulated sugar; Method. Halve the oranges and squeeze the juice into a large stainless-steel pan. Scoop the pips and pulp into a sieve over the pan and squeeze out as much juice as possible, then tie the ...
From rnz.co.nz


THE BEST SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE CAKE – ALMOST ITALIAN
2020-08-22 Preparation. 1. Heat oven to 175º c. Grease a 23 cm by 13 cm loaf pan. Line with baking paper. 2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat together softened butter, sugar, lime zest and orange zest for about 5 minutes, until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a …
From almostitalian.blog


SEVILLE ORANGE AND GIN MARMALADE - THE USUAL SAUCEPANS
2017-02-13 Add in the sugar and stir until it is entirely dissolved. Add the muslin back of the flesh and the gin. Turn the heat up so that it boils. Boil for 15 minutes, skimming off any scum that comes off the oranges. To test the setting point, drop a little of the marmalade on to the cold saucer (that you put in the fridge earlier).
From theusualsaucepans.com


EARL GREY & ORANGE SCONES RECIPE | WAITROSE & PARTNERS
Ingredients. Put 150ml milk into a small saucepan, add the tea leaves and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat, cool, cover and chill in the fridge overnight, or for at least a couple of hours, to allow the flavour to infuse. Preheat the oven to 200°C, gas mark 6. Put the flour and baking powder in a mixing bowl.
From waitrose.com


SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE RECIPE - LOVEFOOD.COM
Add the sugar and measured water (or enough water to cover the sugar) to the saucepan with the orange and lemon pulp. Stir, then set the saucepan over a high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Cook the pulp mixture for about 40 minutes until it reaches 105°C (221°F) on a sugar thermometer. Meanwhile, use a sharp knife to finely shred the ...
From lovefood.com


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Top Asked Questions

What is Seville orange marmalade?
The intensely sharp, bitter Seville oranges here hold their own, conquering the sweetness of the sugar; that fresh, intensely orange fragrance and flavour are unmatched in any preserve anywhere in the world. You can now watch How to Make Marmalade in our Online Cookery School Video on this page. This recipe is from Delia's Complete How to Cook .
How do you cook Seville oranges?
Cut the navel orange into similar-sized pieces. 4. In a large (10-12 quart/liter) stockpot, add the orange slices, seed pouch, water, and salt, as well as the juice from the Seville oranges from step #1. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer, and cook until the peels are translucent, about 20 to 30 minutes.
How do you make marmalade with oranges?
Allow oranges to cool until they are easy to handle, then cut in half. Scoop out all the pips and pith and add to the reserved orange liquid in the pan. Bring to the boil for 6 minutes, then strain this liquid through a sieve into a bowl and press the pulp through with a wooden spoon - it is high in pectin so gives marmalade a good set.
What can I do with short Seville oranges?
Seville orange marmalade Make the most of the short Seville orange season by using them in this delicious Seville orange marmalade recipe By The Good Housekeeping Cookery Team

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